Planning Your Estate During the Coronavirus Pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic is at the forefront of everyone’s minds right now, and just about everyone has had to make major changes to their lives to contain its spread. However, the coronavirus has been particularly impactful on the elderly and those with chronic health conditions, who may not be prepared for what happens if they become seriously ill during this crisis. Fortunately, however, there are still steps you can take to plan your estate during the pandemic.

As we have all heard at this point, the coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, is a highly infectious disease that can be spread through the air, by touching a contaminated surface or by physical contact with the infected or their bodily fluids. Many people infected by the disease require hospitalization, and right now most of our area hospitals are facing a shortage of staff and equipment to fight the disease. As a result, many people are now focused on what plans are in place for their families, their health and even their assets should they contract the virus and God-forbid pass away.  Most are realizing that they don’t have any type of estate plan in place.

Fortunately, Governor Andrew Cuomo has signed an executive order allowing for the remote witnessing of Wills, as well as remote notarization for documents like a Power of Attorney or Trusts. This measure can allow people to create an estate plan from the comfort of their own homes, without needing to go outside and potentially expose themselves to the coronavirus. This is particularly good news for anyone who is especially vulnerable to the virus, minimizing the risk to their health while ensuring their loved ones will be taken care of in case the worst happens.

The New York elder law attorneys at Tully Law, PC have helped thousands of Nassau County, Suffolk County and New York City residents navigate the complicated process of planning their estates, as well as planning for Medicaid’s community home care and nursing home programs. For more information about our estate planning and Medicaid eligibility services or to schedule a consultation, contact our Long Island elder law firm at (631) 424-2800 or visit our contact page.